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NHS Long Term Plan Webinar Series

  Reducing the burden
on the NHS
A digital enablement perspective
13 July 2021
13:00 - 14:00 - BST

Presenters

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Dr Yassir Javaid

Clinical Adviser for Cardiology

Royal College of General Practitioners

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Prof Partha Kar OBE

National Specialty Advisor, Diabetes

NHS England & Improvement

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Dr Susan Connolly

Consultant Cardiologist

MB BCh BAO, PhD, FRCP Edinburgh

Western Health and Social Care Trust

Northern Ireland

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Dr Jonathan Schofield

Clinical Lead, Diabetes Endocrinology & Metabolism

Manchester University NHS Foundation Trust

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Aideen O'Colmain

Business Director

Fitbit Health Solutions - EMEA

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Poor lifestyle choices are leading to a rapid growth in non-communicable diseases, resulting in increased healthcare expenditure, preventable morbidity, and premature deaths.

 

The increasingly sedentary nature of our lifestyles, which can lead to obesity or being overweight, has contributed to growth in the numbers suffering from type 2 diabetes and heart disease.

 

Prevention and effective management of long-term conditions is likely to be more cost effective than treating the illnesses as they occur.

 

This webinar will highlight how behaviour change can reduce the likelihood of becoming obese, becoming type 2 diabetic, or suffering from heart disease.

 

The session will look at recommendations around four key health and wellness pillars; activity, sleep, stress and nutrition and how achieving balance across them can help prevent some non-communicable diseases.

 

It will explore ‘social prescriptions’ and the role they can play to help those at risk of, or suffering from these diseases to actively participate in their own health and care.

 

Additionally, it will consider how remote patient monitoring can help proactively manage these patient populations outside of primary and secondary care environments, reducing the burden on NHS resources.